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The death toll in the London tower fire has risen to 79by Circa News
Global News#GrenfellTower

UPDATE June 19, 6:54 a.m. EST:

Authorities confirmed on Monday that 79 people have died in the high-rise apartment building fire in London.

Police Commander Stuart Cundy confirmed the increase in the death toll while speaking to reporters outside of Scotland Yard on Monday. The previous number of deaths reported was 58.

Five missing people originally registered as missing have been confirmed safe.

UPDATE 11:43 a.m. EST:

London police say 58 people who were in Grenfell Tower are still missing and assumed to be dead. Authorities Saturday said that this number, which was based on reports from the public, may rise.

He says it will take weeks or longer to recover and identify all the dead in the public housing block that was devastated by a fire early Wednesday.

A nearby train had also been partially suspended due to safety concerns.

UPDATE June 17, 8:59 a.m. EST:Queen Elizabeth II marked a minute of silence Saturday for victims of the London high-rise inferno that killed at least 30 people.

Firefighters are still  searching for more bodies.

Much of the public is angry over a lack of questions about how the blaze spread so quickly.

Several reports claim that contractors installed a cheaper, less flame-resistant type of exterior paneling in a renovation of Grenfell Tower that ended in May 2016.

We are equally determined, without fear or favor, to support all those rebuilding lives so horribly affected by injury and loss.

Queen Elizabeth II

The Queen also issued a somber message on her birthday following her visit to the site of the fire:

"Today is traditionally a day of celebration," Queen Elizabeth said in a statement. "This year, however, it is difficult to escape a very somber national mood. In recent months, the country has witnessed a succession of terrible tragedies."

"Put to the test, the United Kingdom has been resolute in the face of adversity," she wrote.

UPDATE June 16, 8:11 a.m. EST: 30 people  are now confirmed dead in Grenfell Tower fire.

Theresa May Friday visited Grenfell Tower victims at the hospital, hours after Britain's Queen Elizabeth visited the scene to meet with members of the community affected by the fire.

UPDATE June 15, 6:48 a.m. EST:

At least 17 people died in the massive fire that engulfed London's Grenfell Tower, the BBC reported, citing police.

The fire service said earlier that it does not expect to find any more survivors.

Thirty people remain hospitalized, 17 of them in critical condition.

WATCH | Fire destroyed a London residential tower.

UPDATE 12:12 p.m. EST:

At least 12 people have died as a result of the Grenfell Tower blaze, according to London's Metropolitan Police, and the number is expected to rise, CNN reported.

78 people have been treated at six different hospitals, and 18 of them are in critical condition.

Authorities said the recovery operation will be "lengthy" and "complicated."

UPDATE 7:18 a.m. EST: 74 people are being treated at hospitals, with 20 in critical care.

UPDATE 6:54 a.m. EST:

London's Fire Brigade said a structural engineer and rescue crews have assessed the stability of Grenfell Tower and believe it is not in danger of collapsing, the Associated Press reported.

"It is safe for our crews to be in there," the brigade said, adding that the cause of the fire remains unknown.

ORIGINAL STORY: At least six people are dead and more than 50 have been hospitalized after a fire engulfed a residential tower in London overnight, the BBC reported.

Firefighters rescued "large numbers" of people from Grenfell Tower in north Kensington but London Mayor Sadiq Khan said many people are unaccounted for.

The 24-story building is still on fire and appears at risk of collapsing.

Witnesses described a horrific scene, with people trapped in the burning building screaming for help for themselves and their children. Some reported seeing lights -- perhaps cell phones -- flashing near the top of the building as trapped residents, some holding children, stood by their windows.

Some were quick to speculate that the blaze was "no accident."

Smoke from the fire hovered over London early Wednesday.