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Snowden supporters want a pardon. The paper that won a Pulitzer because of him doesn't. by Circa News
Privacy

When Edward Snowden released secret NSA documents, he shared them with four news outlets: The Guardian, The New York Times, The Intercept and The Washington Post.

When Snowden supporters called for a presidential for pardon last week, the first three news outlets stood with him. The Post did not, instead calling for him to stand trial. 

As The Intercept pointed out, that's the first time a newspaper has called for the prosecution of its own source -- and the Post's coverage of the NSA won it a Pulitzer Prize.

The request for a pardon came days before the nationwide release of the movie "Snowden." 

"Shouldn't they be attacking their own paper's news editors for having chosen to make it public?"

Glenn Greenwald, Intercept writer

The Post argued that while some good came of Snowden's leaks, he also revealed legal, non-invasive government programs like PRISM, which the NSA used to monitor the Internet. 

But The Intercept, which argued for Snowden's pardon, countered by saying the Post made PRISM front-page news.

"No specific harm, actual or attempted, to any individual American was ever shown to have resulted from the NSA telephone metadata program..."

The Washington Post

Snowden has argued that U.S. law prevents him from being able to claim the positive impact of his disclosures as a legal defense. But the Post argued that Snowden didn't do much good at all.


WATCH | Here's Snowden explaining in his own words why he won't ask for a pardon himself.

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