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Loan forgiveness could vanish under Trump's $10.6 budget cut on educationby Circa News
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College work-study programs, public-service loan forgiveness and mental health resources at public schools would be drastically affected if the Trump administration moves forward with a plan to cut $10.6 billion from federal education initiatives, budget documents obtained by the Washington Post revealed. 

Instead, the funds would be funneled to school choice initiatives while also investing in charter schools and vouchers for private and religious schools. 

Though the budget has yet to be implemented, the obtained documents align with Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' past rhetoric on expanding school choice and shrinking the role of the federal government in education.

Described by one Education Department employee as a "near-final" version of the budget, the documents are expected to public surface next week.

The proposed budget would alter financial aid programs that help nearly 12 million students pay for college.

A White House officials on Wednesday told the Washington Post that it would be premature to comment on an "ever-changing international discussion" before its publication. “The president and his Cabinet are working collaboratively to create a leaner, more efficient government that does more with less of taxpayers’ hard-earned dollars,” the official said.

Though the figures are preliminary, the proposed budget calls for a net $9.2 billion cut to the department. It would also jeopardize the $1.2 billion for after-school programs that serve 1.6 million children, most of whom are poor.


Other changes include cuts to the $15 million program that provides child care for low-income parents in college; a $27 million arts education program; two programs targeting Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian students, totaling $65 million; two international education and foreign language programs, $72 million; a $12 million program for gifted students; and $12 million for Special Olympics education programs.

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