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Here's a breakdown of all the ongoing investigations into this Russia mess by Kellan Howell
Issues#russia

WATCH | Are you confused about what's going on with all the investigations involving Russia and the White House? Don't feel bad. There are a lot of them and they are getting bigger. Here's a handy breakdown of who is investigating what. 

Add wiretaps to the list

This weekend, President Trump accused former President Barack Obama of tapping his phones in Trump Tower during the election season.  

A spokesperson for Obama and James Clapper, the former Director of National Intelligence, both denied the allegations.

Trump has demanded an investigation into the surveillance and on Sunday, Devin Nunes, the chair of the House Intelligence Committee said that panel would.  

Intelligence Committee Investigations 

Members of the Senate Intelligence Committee haven't indicated that they will investigate the wiretaps but both the Senate and House committees are still looking into Russia's involvement in the 2016 election. 

The committees are also investigating ties between Russia and individuals associated with political campaigns. 

Judiciary investigation

The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism is also investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 election. 

Subcommittee chairman Sen. Lindsey Graham (R--N.C.) is known for being a Russia hawk.

"Our goal is simple - to the fullest extent possible we want to shine a light on Russian activities to undermine democracy," Graham said in a February statement announcing the investigation. 

House Oversight Committee 

Congress' main investigative committee isn't looking into Russia's ties to the White House, but it is investigating leaks of classified information about conversations former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn had with the Russian Ambassador to the U.S. 

Flynn was forced to resign after the leaks revealed he discussed economic sanctions with Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. He had told Vice President Mike Pence that they did not talk about sanctions. 

Senate Armed Services focused on preventing more hacks

While everyone else is looking into alleged ties and communications between White House officials and the Kremlin, the Senate Armed Services Committee is hoping to come up with solutions to protect America from future cyber threats. 

Committee Chair John McCain has said his panel will look into how the  U.S. can best deter cyberattacks from foreign countries like Russia and will hold hearings to interview top cybersecurity officials. 

Some lawmakers say its not enough 

Democrats have been calling for the creation of a special, bipartisan select committee investigation -- similar to the 9/11 commission --  but Republicans want to keep the probes inside standing committees. 

Increasingly Democrats and even some Republicans have been calling for a special prosecutor to investigate connections between Trump campaign officials and Russia.  A new poll today shows that most Americans want a special prosecutor.

Justice Department 

Meanwhile, the FBI is doing a little digging of its own into the Russia situation. 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has recused himself from any investigations into the Trump campaign's ties to Russia after it was revealed he had also met with Kislyak while he was still a Senator.

Senators often meet with foreign diplomats, but it's unclear if Sessions met with Kislyak on Senate business or as a surrogate for Trump's campaign. 

The O.G. investigation

Don't forget, back in December, then-President Obama ordered the intelligence community to review the hacks of the Democratic National Committee. That report came out in early January and concluded that Russian President Vladimir Putin had very likely ordered the hacks to undermine Hillary Clinton's campaign. 

Trump initially denied those findings, but later said he thought Russia was probably behind the hacks. 

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