Please rotate your screen to portrait for optimal viewing experience

Kellyanne Conway will serve as Trump's counselor. So what exactly does a 'counselor' do?by Raffi Williams
Election 2016

WATCH  | Donald Trump picked his former campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, to serve as counselor to the President. Conway made history this year as the first woman to be campaign manager for a winning presidential campaign.

A catch-all position

White House counselor is a position that was established by former President Richard Nixon in 1969. 

It is a senior-level position that's tasked with helping Trump with his messaging and execution of his legislative priorities -- so the day-to-day tasks can vary widely. 

The position does not require Senate confirmation.

Important -- but not essential?

John Podesta, Obama's former White House counselor, worked on issues like Ebola and immigration. George W. Bush's former counselor Ed Gillespie was tasked with selling the Iraq troop surge to the American people. 

While the job is important, it's not essential -- both Bush and Obama went long stretches without anyone in the role. It is unclear exactly what issues Conway will be tasked with, but she joins Reince Priebus and Steve Bannon as Trump's top-level staffers.

From campaign manager to counselor

"Kellyanne Conway has been a trusted advisor and strategist who played a crucial role in my victory," Trump said in a statement announcing the hire. 

"She is a tireless and tenacious advocate of my agenda and has amazing insights on how to effectively communicate our message. I am pleased that she will be part of my senior team in the West Wing."




Humbled and honored

"I want to thank the President-elect for this amazing opportunity. A Trump presidency will bring real change to Washington and to Americans across this great nation," Conway said in the statement released by the transition team.

"I am humbled and honored to play a role in helping transform the movement he has led into a real agenda of action and results."

Conway once said she was hesitant to accept a White House role because of her kids.

WATCH | For the news you need, check out our 60 Second Circa.