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The FBI is not expected to charge Michael Flynn but that doesn't mean the dust has settledby Julia Boccagno
Accountability

The Federal Bureau of Investigation said it doesn't intend to pursue charges against Michael Flynn for discussing sanctions with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak on a phone call in December 2016, according to CNN. The news comes just hours after Republicans and Democratic leaders of the US Senate Judiciary Committee urged Attorney General Jeff Sessions and FBI Director James Comey to provide documents and briefings on the resignation of the former national security adviser. 

CNN reported that Flynn cooperated with the FBI.

Earlier in the day, Sens. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) sent a letter to Sessions and Comey,formally requesting information tied to Flynn's resignation.

"We request that individuals with specific knowledge of these issues from both the FBI and Justice Department brief Committee Members and staff," they wrote in the letter.

They also requested the transcript of Flynn's "intercepted calls and the FBI report summarizing the intercepted calls referenced in the media."

"These reports raise substantial questions about the content and context of Mr. Flynn’s discussions with Russian officials, the conclusions reached by the Justice Department and the actions it took in response, as well as possible leaks of classified information by current and former government employees," Grassley and Feinstein wrote. 

In addition to Grassley and Feinstein, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) announced on Wednesday that he's sending a list of questions to the White House to determine how Vice President Mike Pence was "lied to" by Flynn, according to Politico. 

"I'm worried about a situation where the Vice President of the United States is lied to by the national security adviser," McCain said. "We need to ask questions and get answers."