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These students grew up with Obama. Here's how they're reacting to the new president.by Circa Campus
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Watch |  Millennials grew up in the Obama era and now they have to get used to a different government... President Trump's government.

This story was done in partnership with GenFKD, a college news site for economics as part of Circa Campus.

On Friday, January 20th, President Donald J. Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.  Since his inauguration, there have been protests and rallies in opposition to his decisions and executive orders, including on George Mason's campus in Fairfax, VA.  After growing up during a primarily Democratic government under the Obama administration, for many millennials, the inauguration for President Trump has tested their economic and political views.

Savannah Behrmann, a George Mason student, had this reaction, “My mom’s been re-diagnosed with cancer and the Affordable Care Act right now is currently paying for her chemotherapy. To live under an administration that really tried to fight for the rights of health insurance for everybody made a huge impact on me.”

Many college students have already compared President Trump's first few days to that of former President Barack Obama's and wonder how his future policies will affect them economically.



 Caiti Lively, a George Mason student, with the "College Republicans" said this, “Now that the stock market is going back up and jobs are being released, my dad is on the verge of getting another job so that’s great.”

Adia McLaughlin, a GMU student felt a little different,  “I do think that it’s not gonna help so much outside of the workforce. So those who don’t have that formal training that he’s probably going to be offering, or something like that, therefore making a bigger wage gap between the rich and the poor.”

There will be a lot of special attention on President Trump as he nears the end of his first 100 days.

"I'm excited but at the same time nervous, but I think I speak for all Americans when I say that we're just hoping for the best right now."

Adia McLaughlin, GMU Student

Someone created "missing Obama" posters. 

Some people are glad he's gone.

It looks like the international community misses him too.